Blog

Give a Little, Take a Little

Delivering—and Receiving—Negative Feedback in a Constructive Way by Sabine Berlin with Sandi Larsen Constructive feedback (often seen in the writer’s head as negative feedback) is a hard pill to swallow. Nobody wants to be told the story they’ve devoted hours, months,...

Memoirs: How to Write and Publish Your True Story

by Brittany Passmore Everyone has a story to tell, and that story isn’t always fictional. Many writers have found memoir to be the perfect genre for telling their impactful life stories and sharing their histories with millions of others. You’ve probably heard of and...

What to Do When Your Imagination Fails to Translate to the Page

by Amy Michelle Carpenter and Angela Woiwode with Angela Eschler Writers possess active imaginations as well as an eagerness to share what those imaginations produce, and so it’s frustrating when what’s in our head fails to translate to the page.  There are many...
What to Do  When Your Imagination Fails to Translate to the Page

What to Do When Your Imagination Fails to Translate to the Page

by Amy Michelle Carpenter and Angela Woiwode with Angela Eschler Writers possess active imaginations as well as an eagerness to share what those imaginations produce, and so it’s frustrating when what’s in our head fails to translate to the page. There are many possibilities for why our end result isn’t matching what we’ve envisioned. For one, we may struggle so much with grammar and punctuation that the reader can’t get past those issues to und…

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The Fainting Damsel

The Fainting Damsel

Adding Emotion to Your Writing without the Melodrama by Amy Michelle Carpenter and Angela Woiwode Many writers struggle with making their writing shine and adding emotion without making it melodramatic. It can be tempting to rev up the drama in every scene to ensure that your readers feel each emotional pang your characters feel. But a writer who does so is like a musician who sings each note with as much gusto as he can. Emotional emphasis every…

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Getting Your Book into Libraries

Getting Your Book into Libraries

by Lindsay Flanagan You want to build an audience for your books, and whether you’re traditionally or self published, finding readers in this saturated market can be hard. An often overlooked way to find fans is through the library—yes, that place you (or your parents?) used to do research for book reports and essays. Despite the advance of the ebook, library shelves aren’t gathering dust yet! Plenty of readers try a recommended book out via the…

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Book Cover Marketing

Book Cover Marketing

Seven Ways to Ensure Your Cover Is Worthy of Your Story by Sabine Berlin You’ve been taught your whole life: Don’t judge a book by its cover. It’s great advice. Who knows what friendships you might have missed out on, what new things you might not have tried if this hadn’t been hammered into your head since childhood? But the funny thing is, the one place where that advice should be easiest to follow is the one place where the rule flies right o…

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Short Is the New Long—5 Tips

Short Is the New Long—5 Tips

Five Tips for Short Works That Sell by Sabine Berlin “The novella has become the Rosalind Russell of American literature, liked by all the guys but never taken out on a date.” —Gregory Feeley When I first started writing, the thinking above was still in vogue, and the advice to avoid novellas came at a pretty constant rate. But times are changing! Rosalind Russell, as the metaphor goes, has found her man. Traditionally, short stories and novellas…

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Channeling Your Inner Voice

Channeling Your Inner Voice

by Sabine Berlin (with Heidi Brockbank and Angela Eschler doing backup) Okay, I’ll admit it: I love NBC’s The Voice. It might be because of the amazing talent that presents itself on stage each week. It might be because of Adam Levine. Either way, if it’s on, I find myself dropping everything and listening. I can’t sing for the life of me, but I can imagine what those contestants must be feeling as they get on stage, hoping that one of the judge…

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Finding a Marketable Angle

Finding a Marketable Angle

by Angela Eschler and Lindsay Flanagan What’s the number-one thing you should start with if you want to see your nonfiction book successfully published and your message gaining traction? Your angle. Finding Your Angle The way you approach your subject will either draw your ideal clients in or push them away. Your unique angle is your hook—it’s what will draw in curious readers who want to see or experience fulfillment of the promise you’re makin…

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