Editing

7 Steps for Hiring a Good Editor

by Victoria Passey 1. Understand the different types of editing. There are several types of editing: content/developmental editing, substantive/deep-line editing, copyediting, and proofreading, as well as edits for style guides and fact-checking. Together, they create...

The Fainting Damsel

Adding Emotion to Your Writing without the Melodrama by Amy Michelle Carpenter and Angela Woiwode Many writers struggle with making their writing shine and adding emotion without making it melodramatic. It can be tempting to rev up the drama in every scene to ensure...

How to Get Your Book Done Quickly

A Cautionary Tale by Angela Eschler As a coach, speaker, or business owner, you may have heard that being a bestselling author gives you more credibility than being a doctor these days—that it’s the golden ticket to business success. So obviously, you need to get your...
Avoid a Big Newbie Mistake

Avoid a Big Newbie Mistake

Avoid a Big Newbie Mistake — Learn What an Editor Should Do Before Your Books Go Public By Angela Eschler and Kat Gille You write to communicate to the hearts and minds of others what’s burning inside you— And we edit to let the fire show through the smoke. —Arthur Plotnik, The Elements of Editing   What is one of the biggest mistakes new authors make before sending their books into the world? Not hiring a professional editor. I know, I know . . …

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Avoiding Narrator Intrusion

Avoiding Narrator Intrusion

by Emilee Newman Bowles Hello, “dear reader” As a young English Lit student, I laughed to myself when a story addressed the reader like this. It used to be common to tell the “dear reader” the moral of the story. These days it’s passé. Even if you know you should avoid speaking directly to the reader, there’s more than one way to send a reader catapulting away from your story through narrator intrusion. Let’s be clear before we get started: we’r…

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How to Get Your Book Done Quickly

How to Get Your Book Done Quickly

A Cautionary Tale by Angela Eschler As a coach, speaker, or business owner, you may have heard that being a bestselling author gives you more credibility than being a doctor these days—that it’s the golden ticket to business success. So obviously, you need to get your book out there quickly so you can use it to start expanding—or even building—your platform. After all, having a book helps you: Get more speaking gigs Have another revenue stream t…

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How to Avoid Clichés and Bad Metaphors

How to Avoid Clichés and Bad Metaphors

Her Words Flowed Like a … Tar Stream? How to Avoid Clichés but Not Exchange Them for Bad Metaphors by Angela Eschler with Heidi Brockbank and Sabine Berlin Skilled use of figurative language can take your writing from mundane to magical. It can’t replace well-thought-out plots, empathetic characters, and dialogue that packs a punch—or any other elements of strong writing that make a great story—but a book without figurative language feels a bit …

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The Most Common Advice May Be the Worst

The Most Common Advice May Be the Worst

  by Angela Eschler Next to “Write what you know,” the most common piece of advice I hear at conferences is “Just write every day.” I always cringe a little when I hear that. Not because it’s not good advice. It is. But because it’s not the best advice for a newbie. There’s a context that frames that advice, and if you don’t understand the context, you won’t make good use of the advice. For example, that other common piece of writing advice, “Wri…

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Show and Tell

Show and Tell

by Sabine Berlin The other day I was sitting in a critique session as the words show, don’t tell went off like sirens about my latest submission. This wasn’t the first time I’d heard those words, nor—I’m certain—will it be the last. But they did get me thinking. If I showed as much as everyone there that day wanted me to, my first chapter could have been an entire novella on its own. So what was I supposed to show? Learning to show isn’t just ab…

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Internal Dialogue—Getting It Right

Internal Dialogue—Getting It Right

by Heidi Brockbank As editors, we’ve noticed that one of the tools new and even intermediate writers most often mishandle is internal dialogue. While internal dialogue (also called internal monologue) is a powerful tool the writer can use to help a reader make an emotional connection with a character, writers frequently use it in a way that diminishes its effect and purpose. Too little and you may as well be reading a screenplay—all external act…

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