Nonfiction How-to

Memoirs: How to Write and Publish Your True Story

by Brittany Passmore Everyone has a story to tell, and that story isn’t always fictional. Many writers have found memoir to be the perfect genre for telling their impactful life stories and sharing their histories with millions of others. You’ve probably heard of and...

What to Do When Your Imagination Fails to Translate to the Page

by Amy Michelle Carpenter and Angela Woiwode with Angela Eschler Writers possess active imaginations as well as an eagerness to share what those imaginations produce, and so it’s frustrating when what’s in our head fails to translate to the page.  There are many...

7 Steps for Hiring a Good Editor

by Victoria Passey 1. Understand the different types of editing. There are several types of editing: content/developmental editing, substantive/deep-line editing, copyediting, and proofreading, as well as edits for style guides and fact-checking. Together, they create...
How to Get on the New York Times Bestseller List

How to Get on the New York Times Bestseller List

  by Lindsay Flanagan and Angela Eschler with insights from best-selling author Heather B. Moore The New York Times Bestseller List. The very name sends shivers down your writer’s spine. You envision your books will one day be emblazoned with the badge of honor that counts you as a New York Times Bestselling Author. You know it’s a pretty cool list, and you know you’d like to be on it. So how do you do that? Well, the process isn’t as black and w…

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How to Write a Nonfiction Query Letter

How to Write a Nonfiction Query Letter

by Emilee Newman Bowles and Lindsay Flanagan The query letter. It’s your audition, your one shot at piquing an agent’s or editor’s interest so they want to see more. And it either thrills you to the tips of your fingers to write it or scares you to your very core. We’re guessing it’s the latter, but if it’s the former, well, you can let us know why in the comments below (insert laugh emoji). We’ve also got an informative how-to blog on query let…

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When Is Fair Use Fair?

When Is Fair Use Fair?

by Michele Preisendorf with Angela Eschler Writers love quotes. What word-nerd doesn’t? We tape them on our mirrors, dashboards, and walls and post them to our websites. We like them to set the tone for our novels, start our nonfiction chapters off with inspiration and insight, and add authority to our own ideas. But many writers are never quite sure what’s safe to quote—how much, and in what contexts? Are there instances when you can safely bor…

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The Fainting Damsel

The Fainting Damsel

Adding Emotion to Your Writing without the Melodrama by Amy Michelle Carpenter and Angela Woiwode Many writers struggle with making their writing shine and adding emotion without making it melodramatic. It can be tempting to rev up the drama in every scene to ensure that your readers feel each emotional pang your characters feel. But a writer who does so is like a musician who sings each note with as much gusto as he can. Emotional emphasis every…

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Avoid a Big Newbie Mistake

Avoid a Big Newbie Mistake

Avoid a Big Newbie Mistake — Learn What an Editor Should Do Before Your Books Go Public By Angela Eschler and Kat Gille You write to communicate to the hearts and minds of others what’s burning inside you— And we edit to let the fire show through the smoke. —Arthur Plotnik, The Elements of Editing   What is one of the biggest mistakes new authors make before sending their books into the world? Not hiring a professional editor. I know, I know . . …

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What to Do  When Your Imagination Fails to Translate to the Page

What to Do When Your Imagination Fails to Translate to the Page

by Amy Michelle Carpenter and Angela Woiwode with Angela Eschler Writers possess active imaginations as well as an eagerness to share what those imaginations produce, and so it’s frustrating when what’s in our head fails to translate to the page. There are many possibilities for why our end result isn’t matching what we’ve envisioned. For one, we may struggle so much with grammar and punctuation that the reader can’t get past those issues to und…

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Editor’s Nightstand: Recipes for Success

Editor’s Nightstand: Recipes for Success

“An anesthesiologist has to do only one thing well: Put the patient under without killing him. But she has to know about five hundred things to do it successfully. It is the same with the writer.” —Larry Brooks, Story Physics A writer only has to do a few things well to woo agents, publishers, or an adoring public but having to know hundreds of things in order to do those few well? That sounds like a lot of work—not just an affair with NaNoWriMo…

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